The Roland-Garros semi-final interrupted by an environmental activist



An environmental activist wearing a T-shirt with the message We have 1028 days left interrupted the men’s French Open semi-final between Casper Ruud and 2014 US Open champion Marin Cilic by tying herself to the net with wires and glue and kneeling on the ground.

The game was delayed 13 minutes in a match with Ruud serving in the third set as he led 3-6, 6-4, 4-1, 15-all at Court Philippe Chatrier.

The young woman, of French nationality, entered the court with a valid ticket at the start of the day, the French Tennis Federation said in a press release after Ruud finished winning in four sets to reach his first Grand Final. Slam.

He will face 13-time French Open champion Rafael Nadal for the title on Sunday.

The protester remained on the ground for several minutes before four security guards approached her, untied her from the net and eventually carried her away.

The security team had to positively identify the items they used to enter the pitch before they could remove it,” the federation said, adding that it had been handed over to police.

Tournament Director Amelie Mauresmo watched near the entrance to the pitch and the two players we escorted to the locker room during the episode.

I didn’t really know how to react, and… I didn’t know if she was holding something,” Ruud said.

“I couldn’t see much. So it was a bit of an awkward and difficult situation. It had never happened to me before.

Eventually, Ruud and Cilic came back and had three minutes to warm up before resuming their semi-final.

Cilic said the disruption did not affect his level of play.

There have been other episodes involving people interrupting matches at Court Philippe Chatrier over the years.

In the 2013 men’s final, a topless man wearing a flare jumped onto the court. In the 2009 final, a man approached Roger Federer and tried to put a hat on his head. In the 2003 final, a male streaker crossed the net.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always endeavored to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and that have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your constant encouragement and feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these challenging times stemming from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and up-to-date with credible news, authoritative opinions and incisive commentary on relevant topical issues.
However, we have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to bring you more great content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of bringing you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism we are committed to.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

digital editor

Comments are closed.