French Economy – CC87 Ported OC http://cc87portedoc.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:51:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cc87portedoc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png French Economy – CC87 Ported OC http://cc87portedoc.com/ 32 32 Soup kitchens full as battle rages for Italy’s poor https://cc87portedoc.com/soup-kitchens-full-as-battle-rages-for-italys-poor/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 06:00:23 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/soup-kitchens-full-as-battle-rages-for-italys-poor/ Salerno (Italy) (AFP) – Mario Conte’s soup kitchen in Salerno serves 140 hot meals every day, but as soaring inflation hits poverty-stricken southern Italy, it struggles to keep up with demand. And with far-right leader Giorgia Meloni promising to scrap an anti-poverty program if she wins Sunday’s general election, he fears things will only get […]]]>

Salerno (Italy) (AFP) – Mario Conte’s soup kitchen in Salerno serves 140 hot meals every day, but as soaring inflation hits poverty-stricken southern Italy, it struggles to keep up with demand.

And with far-right leader Giorgia Meloni promising to scrap an anti-poverty program if she wins Sunday’s general election, he fears things will only get worse.

“There will be a flood of people here,” he warned as he handed out food at the San Francesco kitchen, not far from the palm-lined seafront in Salerno, south of Naples.

The eurozone’s third-largest economy is suffering from a cost-of-living crisis exacerbated by Russia’s war in Ukraine.

But as usual, it is southern Italy, long plagued by poverty and unemployment, which is suffering the most.

“I pay the rent, the electricity bill, and then I have nothing left to eat,” says Antonio Mela, 60, a former bartender who lives with his brother on a state pension of 500 euros.

“Everyone is struggling here,” he told AFP, as he took portions of pasta, pork and potatoes, and fruit.

Energy is a major concern in a country dependent on Russian gas, especially here in the Campania region. According to the Italian Poverty Observatory, the region has the highest number of people struggling to pay their electricity and gas bills.

Citizens income

Rocco Papa, spokesman for Catholic charity Caritas which helps run the kitchen, said there was a “chronic” lack of work in Salerno, where one in 13 people are at risk of extreme poverty.

“The conjunction of many factors, the pandemic, the war, has seriously aggravated the situation,” he said.

Although a familiar story across Europe, Italy, with its low-skilled and rapidly aging population, is unique.

It is the only EU country where inflation-adjusted wages fell between 1990 and 2020, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

#photo1

It is also one of six EU countries that does not have a national minimum wage, having instead, since 2019, the so-called “citizens’ income”.

Nearly 2.5 million people claim this allowance for the unemployed, which amounts to an average of 550 euros per month, costing the State 8.3 billion euros this year.

The majority – 1.7 million people – live on the Italian islands or in the south, a region with a large underground economy and where 10% of households live in absolute poverty.

But the benefit has been targeted by fraudsters, and some employers say they are unable to find staff. They accuse young people of preferring to pocket easy money to stay at home.

These payments have become one of the most contentious issues of the election campaign, so much so that Meloni’s far-right Brothers of Italy party, which led the latest opinion polls, has pledged to drop outright and simply the project.

war on poverty

“Citizens’ income has helped tremendously,” said Conte, 70. For a while, many guests stopped coming.

However, rising prices have brought new faces to its doorstep: from divorced fathers to struggling carers, whose low-paid, clandestine work is no longer enough.

The number of people using soup kitchens in Salerno has doubled in recent months, while a canteen run by Caritas in Castellammare, near Naples, has tripled.

#photo2

Conte feeds 10 additional families with young children every morning.

The benefit was the brainchild of the populist Five Star movement, which took power four years ago after winning big in the south.

Now trailing the right in the polls, Five Star has pledged to make earnings “more efficient”, introduce a minimum wage and tackle the gender pay gap.

The centre-left Democratic Party (PD) also wants to keep a reformed version of the benefit. He promised similar anti-poverty measures as well as 500,000 new social housing units and free school meals.

Promote jobs

But for Meloni, citizens’ income is not the solution.

Poverty, she told a rally in Palermo, Sicily this week, “is fought by promoting growth and employment”.

Instead, it offers a benefit for those most at risk: people with disabilities, people over 60 and families in difficulty with young children.

His right-wing coalition, which brings together the Anti-Immigrant League and the right-wing Forza Italia, has also promised tax cuts to boost growth.

#photo3

The latest available polls suggest that Five Star and the Democratic Party’s support for Citizens’ Income could once again win votes in the South – even if not everyone here supports it.

“Young people have to work,” Mela said, as he collected his food from the San Francesco kitchen. “It should be for families, not 30-somethings.

“And they have to check who’s cheating and who’s not cheating.”

]]>
unga: EAM will organize a trilateral with the United Arab Emirates and their French counterparts https://cc87portedoc.com/unga-eam-will-organize-a-trilateral-with-the-united-arab-emirates-and-their-french-counterparts/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 18:32:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/unga-eam-will-organize-a-trilateral-with-the-united-arab-emirates-and-their-french-counterparts/ Foreign Minister S Jaishankar will hold a trilateral ministerial meeting with his counterparts from the United Arab Emirates and France, in addition to meeting the foreign ministers of Egypt and Indonesia on the sidelines of the General Assembly of United Nations in New York. Jaishankar began his visit to the UNGA with a meeting with […]]]>
Foreign Minister S Jaishankar will hold a trilateral ministerial meeting with his counterparts from the United Arab Emirates and France, in addition to meeting the foreign ministers of Egypt and Indonesia on the sidelines of the General Assembly of United Nations in New York.

Jaishankar began his visit to the UNGA with a meeting with his Latin American counterparts from the India-Celac Quartet (Community of Latin American and Caribbean States), as New Delhi decided to step up its engagement in the region.

India, the United Arab Emirates and France had held their first trilateral meeting in July to explore potential cooperation in the Indo-Pacific, including in the areas of maritime security, blue economy, regional connectivity and food and energy security. Monday’s trilateral comes immediately after the French Foreign Minister’s visit to India.

The three sides exchanged views on the Indo-Pacific region during the July meeting and explored potential areas of trilateral cooperation, including maritime security, humanitarian and disaster relief, blue economy, regional connectivity, cooperation in multilateral forums, energy and food security, innovation. and startups, supply chain resilience, and cultural and interpersonal cooperation. They also discussed next steps to deepen trilateral cooperation in the Indo-Pacific.

Celac was represented by Argentine Foreign Minister Santiago Cafiero, Guatemalan Mario Adolfo Bucaro Flores, Amery Browne from Trinidad and Tobago and Colombian Deputy Minister for Multilateral Affairs Laura Gil Savastano. The meeting took stock of developments in the post-pandemic economic recovery and agreed to work closely together in sectors such as trade, agriculture, food and energy security.

]]>
L’Hexagone, Norwich: “Simple things done very well” – restaurant review | Food https://cc87portedoc.com/lhexagone-norwich-simple-things-done-very-well-restaurant-review-food/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/lhexagone-norwich-simple-things-done-very-well-restaurant-review-food/ The Hexagon, 22 Lower Goat Lane, Norwich NR2 1EL (01603 926 886). Starters and small plates £7-£12, mains £14-£24, desserts £7, wines from £21 At the beginning of my happy adventures as a concert musician, putting my bag of borrowed tunes and my boundless, puppy-dog enthusiasm in front of a very kind audience, I had […]]]>

The Hexagon, 22 Lower Goat Lane, Norwich NR2 1EL (01603 926 886). Starters and small plates £7-£12, mains £14-£24, desserts £7, wines from £21

At the beginning of my happy adventures as a concert musician, putting my bag of borrowed tunes and my boundless, puppy-dog enthusiasm in front of a very kind audience, I had an epiphany. Whatever my ambitions, I didn’t have to completely master the piano before playing for people. The jazz world can be dotted with powerful saxophonists who show up to gigs bellowing “any tune, any key, any tempo.” For me, they are divine figures. But I didn’t have to be, in fact I could never be like them. Instead, I just had to be able to play the tunes I was performing at the time. At the time, audiences didn’t need to know that there wasn’t much else beyond the 10-song set they had just heard. I would always be, and indeed will remain, the finest jazz pianist of any British food critic.

There’s a lot to be said for being good at narrow bandwidth; to do a few things very well, rather than trying to prove your exhausting trapeze virtuosity. I thought of that while studying the brown paper menu at L’Hexagone in Norwich. It’s the little French restaurant that really can. It’s the kind of place where we could all do more, when money is tight and we have to take our pleasures with care.

“Thick coating of tapenade doped with garlic”: toast of tomatoes. Photography: The Observer

The decor of the small space, on a narrow cobblestone lane, is what I have just defined to me as refined Goth: the walls are painted black. Downstairs is a bar with seating for at least, ooh, six. Upstairs past the spray painted words”liberty, equality, fraternity”, is a dining room that can accommodate another 20 people. In keeping with the very small size of it all, this lunch menu is barely 50 French words long. Yet these are great French words: a summary of peasant cuisine from the south of France down to the essentials. The cook is the Frenchman Thomas Aubrit, son of a cook, nephew of a butcher. His English wife, Gemma, whom he met at the restaurant where he worked in France, runs the room.

Come early and they will make you very good coffee, pastries and a croque monsieur or madame. Come for lunch and it’s soup, salads and a whole lot of happy stuff involving beef. It’s really the sum of it all: to extend that jazz-food analogy until he submits a resignation letter, it’s a tight nightclub set that hits all the right notes, and most certainly in the right order. The £12 Salad Niçoise is a pleasantly dense, chopped affair, with a lovely arrangement of anchovies and tomatoes, topped with half a boiled egg, its yolk in perfect jammy condition. A tomato tartine is a piece of crispy grilled sourdough coated with a thick layer of garlic tapenade and layered with slices of beef tomato, tightly zigzag with stripes of thick tangy pesto, the French answer to pesto only with a bit of Gallic bluster. Eat the toast with your hands and you’ll feel your lunch on your fingertips for hours, in a joyous way.

“A well-dressed affair”: steak tartare.
“A well-dressed affair”: steak tartare. Photograph: Chris Ridley/The Observer

There is of course a steak and fries or a bavette with shallot sauce. Cheaper, gnarlier cuts get the only treatment they get: simmered until they break down into thready chunks, in a tomato stew with black olives, new potatoes, and the high insistence of fennel seeds. The dish of the day is steak tartare, a well-dressed affair, with a golden egg yolk in its center and a big pile of hand-cut fries, still topped with oily, wrinkled skin. It’s a generous pile for £24.

We could now play “guess the desserts”, but the game won’t last very long, will it? You know it will include chocolate mousse; a moist, slightly grainy milk chocolate version topped with chocolate shavings, all melting on the tongue. Yes, there’s a buttery-yellow crème brûlée, the burnt-sweet surface just begging for the crunch of the teaspoon. Have the vanilla panna cotta with the fruit puree if you like, but mine is always that creme brulee, eaten until I ran the edge of my spoon all the way around the earthenware bowl to remove all the crispy, sweet bits.

“A pleasantly dense and chopped affair”: niçoise salad.
“A pleasantly dense and chopped affair”: niçoise salad. Photography: The Observer

In the evening, a 14-course tasting menu is offered, each course evoking the deep landscape of Provence. Do not be dumb. Of course there isn’t. It would be exhausting. It’s exactly the same tight and mouth-watering proposition, perhaps with the addition of a fish dish. It’s just a bunch of simple things very well done and with a real seductive charm. To accompany it, drink something sweet and familiar from the short wine list that you haven’t heard of anywhere else but in France. Almost everything is available by the glass; almost everything is under £40. Don’t come to L’Hexagone expecting a drama that will change your life. Come here expecting to be fed. Incidentally, the name is a French nickname for the shape of their country. I didn’t know it and now I know it. Every day is a school day.

While I’m wandering around Norwich, I have to mention chef Jimmy Preston’s XO Kitchen, which in its own way also fits into a narrow setting, in this case cheeky pie-eating through Asian flavors. They knew I was coming, indeed allowed me to order ahead because otherwise I would have been too late for the last orders. Therefore, this can’t really be considered a review, but I loved the slapping flavors so much that they have to be mentioned. Come for the char sui pork belly, both charred and wonky under a jaw-dropping rust-colored sauce, with a heap of pickled cucumber and a dollop of Norwich-appropriate Coleman mustard.

“Begging for the crack of a teaspoon”: creme brulee.
“Begging for the crack of a teaspoon”: creme brulee. Photograph: Chris Ridley/The Observer

Soothe the mustard burn with watermelon salad, in a large soup dressing filled with mint, peanuts and fresh chili. Order the beef massaman, a lush coconut curry, with a piece of chopped bone, the well filled with wanky, hot bone marrow. Particular praise goes to their BBQ hispi cabbage, with a black bean vinaigrette and crispy golden rubble that Preston calls the XO seasoning. So what exactly is Jimmy? “Well,” he said slowly. “You need a pig element for XO, so it’s crushed Frazzles. And then you need dried seafood, so that’s Scampi Fries. He looks away. “Monster Munch may also have been involved.” If you are appalled by this, what are you doing reading this column? It’s pure genius. The others go to Norwich. Lunch at L’Hexagone. Dinner at XO Kitchen. Or the opposite. I do not care. Anyway, job done.

News

Want to have lunch at your local supermarket? Then you are in luck. Boparan Restaurant Group, which owns a host of top brands such as Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Slim Chickens and Caffè Carluccio, has opened its first ‘Restaurant Hub’ at a branch of Sainsbury’s in Sydenham, south London. Another is likely to follow in Wolverhampton, as part of plans to open 30 restaurants in the coming year, each offering food from various brands, eat-in and take-out.

The Hawksmoor group of steakhouses, which will soon open an outpost in Liverpool alongside those in London, Manchester, Edinburgh and New York, have become one of the few restaurant businesses in the UK to be certified as company B Corp. The certification, by the non-profit network B Lab, means that they have been evaluated to bring benefits not only to their shareholders, but also to their employees, customers and the environment. They will be reassessed every three years. Visit thehawksmoor.com.

Staff shortages are endemic across the economy, but it seems the hospitality sector is really suffering more than most. According to analysis of Office of National Statistics data by Koozai, a digital marketing agency, well over a third of catering and accommodation businesses are struggling to recruit the qualified staff they need. The other most affected sectors are construction and transport.

Email Jay at jay.rayner@observer.co.uk or follow him on Twitter @jayrayner1

]]>
French welders can help fight Putin’s gas shortage https://cc87portedoc.com/french-welders-can-help-fight-putins-gas-shortage/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 15:19:43 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/french-welders-can-help-fight-putins-gas-shortage/ The foot soldiers of Europe’s war economy are on the move. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen this week paid tribute to those who are “bravely” coping with the effects of Russian gas cuts, citing Italian industrial workers who are now starting their shifts before the dawn, when energy is cheaper. Yet if there’s […]]]>

The foot soldiers of Europe’s war economy are on the move. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen this week paid tribute to those who are “bravely” coping with the effects of Russian gas cuts, citing Italian industrial workers who are now starting their shifts before the dawn, when energy is cheaper.

Yet if there’s one modern-day ‘Rosie the Riveter’ who could end up dealing a blow to Russian President Vladimir Putin this winter, it’s the industrial welders, pipe fitters and scrap metal workers tasked with salvaging a string of nuclear power plants. aging French women. online by 2023.

The stakes are high: 32 out of 56 reactors are out of service, including around ten due to corrosion problems. The outage has an economic cost of 29 billion euros ($29 billion) in lost revenue for the soon-to-be-nationalized utility Électricité de France SA. But it also has global ramifications, depriving Europe and France of a fully operational capacity of 61.4 gigawatts of carbon-free electricity, exacerbating the effects of a shortage of natural gas and sowing the seeds of division between allies.

Repairs are fraught with challenges, with widespread skepticism about whether they will be done quickly or easily given the shortage of workers and materials. In addition to the global personnel shortages revealed by Covid-19, welding in a nuclear power plant has its own skills, training and rules to follow due to radiological risks. And its supply chain – including Italian factories making the necessary pipe materials – is under its own pressure due to the energy crisis.

Given the urgent need for energy, the temptation could be to ease some red tape and perhaps even delay some repairs to keep pumping electricity, especially if the security risks are not all to the same degree. .

But even in times of war, these are repairs that should not be postponed. Mark Hibbs, a senior fellow in the nuclear policy program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, notes that France’s great talent was to produce large-scale nuclear power plants based on the same design. It is urgent that this does not become an inconvenience if replicated failures impact the network.

There is also a wider need for the nuclear industry to regain credibility after a series of high-profile cost overruns and delays, including EDF’s next-generation Flamanville plant which is over a decade old. delay. The longer factories remain closed, the easier it is for green parties to criticize the sector’s cost and safety record despite its zero-emissions technology.

France should pull all available levers to effect these repairs and alleviate Europe’s energy crisis. He opened a welding school called Hefais, a play on the mythical forge god Hephaestus, to train more workers. Talent has been brought in from Eastern Europe, the Nordics and beyond to join the effort – much like when the wildfires this summer saw resources flow in from elsewhere.

One of the difficulties in training new industrial workers is overcoming the perception that it is thankless, difficult and low-value work – a challenge felt by many sectors after Covid-19. One obvious area is pay: Frédéric Guimbal, managing director of the Fregate Group, says the current high demand for welders means that the usual salary of around 3,000 euros per month may have to increase accordingly. Considering that the French state wants to pay the next EDF CEO more than 450,000 euros a year to attract top talent for vital but often thankless work, the same logic should apply.

Once the repairs have been completed and EDF’s nuclear production has returned to an acceptable level, a long-term reflection on the role of nuclear power will be necessary. If the industry has lost talent over the years, it is also because of the image over the years of a sector with no future – the Fukushima accident in 2011 having pushed certain countries like Germany to get out of it altogether. It now looks like a mistake, as even Germany seems to recognize, but we are still a long way from Charles de Gaulle’s promotion of nuclear as the technology “of tomorrow”.

Although EDF and French President Emmanuel Macron clearly want to seize the opportunity of a new nuclear renaissance to achieve climate goals and ensure energy independence, these are multi-decade plans that may face obstacles to short term. Macron himself, under pressure from the Greens, once encouraged nuclear cuts and closed France’s oldest power plant in 2020. And EDF’s flagship European pressure reactor, originally a symbol of Franco expertise -Germany, has since become a symbol of French political interference and infighting between the elites. engineers.

That will come later. For now, the focus should be on firing the reactors. Perhaps in the future, von der Leyen will talk about nuclear in his speeches – not just as an energy source that helps Europe meet its zero emissions goals, but as a geopolitical defense against Putin. . And, of course, the value of welders in wartime.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Lionel Laurent is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering digital currencies, the European Union and France. Previously, he was a reporter for Reuters and Forbes.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

]]>
India and France to set up trilateral Indo-Pacific development fund to support innovators and start-ups https://cc87portedoc.com/india-and-france-to-set-up-trilateral-indo-pacific-development-fund-to-support-innovators-and-start-ups/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 15:41:57 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/india-and-france-to-set-up-trilateral-indo-pacific-development-fund-to-support-innovators-and-start-ups/ India and France will work to establish a trilateral Indo-Pacific development cooperation fund to support India-based innovators and start-ups. This was decided on Wednesday by Foreign Minister S Jaishankar and his French counterpart Catherine Colonna during their bilateral meeting. “As part of their cooperation in the Indo-Pacific, the two ministers agreed to work towards the […]]]>

India and France will work to establish a trilateral Indo-Pacific development cooperation fund to support India-based innovators and start-ups.

This was decided on Wednesday by Foreign Minister S Jaishankar and his French counterpart Catherine Colonna during their bilateral meeting.

“As part of their cooperation in the Indo-Pacific, the two ministers agreed to work towards the establishment of a trilateral Indo-Pacific Development Cooperation Fund to help innovators and start-ups based in India to bring their innovations to third countries, particularly in the Indo-Pacific region, while exploring opportunities to undertake development projects within the framework of the International Solar Alliance and its STAR-C project to which the France has contributed up to one million euros,” according to a press release from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The two ministers also expressed interest in resuming cooperation under the India-France-Australia trilateral mechanism. “Ministers looked forward to the trilateral ministerial meeting to be held in New York on the sidelines of the UNGA later this month,” the statement said.

Advancing Defense Links

The French minister, who is on a three-day official visit to India, stressed her country’s interest in advancing defense cooperation. “No other country is ready to share its most advanced defense technologies with India as much as France. And we are proud to be one of your very first defense partners, not only industrially but also operational,” she said in her opening remarks at a joint press conference.

Our ambitions are also very high in the field of space, and we will soon start a new dialogue on space security issues, she said, adding that cybersecurity cooperation between the two nations was also progressing well and that our cooperation in the fight against terrorism remained very close. . “We are already doing a lot together on low carbon energy. Our Jaitapur civilian nuclear project is progressing well,” she said.

The two ministers also expressed their belief that the resumption of negotiations on the India-EU Trade and Investment Agreement and the Geographical Indicators Agreement will significantly boost bilateral trade. “The Indian side appreciated France’s efforts during its presidency of the EU Council to ensure the restart of trade negotiations. Both sides agreed that the early conclusion of the agreements would further accelerate the steady increase in bilateral trade which reached $9.87 billion during the period April 2021 – January 2022,” he added.

Both also welcomed the conclusion of new projects in the field of bilateral development cooperation, in particular the credit facility agreement between the Directorate of Economic Affairs, the Ministry of Finance and the French Development Agency (AFD) for the drinking water project in Chandigarh.

The support provided by Proparco, AFD’s private sector development subsidiary, and other European partners, to Sahyadri Farms, Maharashtra, India’s first farmer-run business, was also discussed.

Published on

September 14, 2022

]]>
The Cuban factory that rolled Castro’s cigars still strives for “the perfect puff” https://cc87portedoc.com/the-cuban-factory-that-rolled-castros-cigars-still-strives-for-the-perfect-puff/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 19:22:34 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/the-cuban-factory-that-rolled-castros-cigars-still-strives-for-the-perfect-puff/ Published on: 09/12/2022 – 21:22 Havana (AFP) – Sitting in front of a machine that checks the quality of cigars, Orquidea Gonzalez says she is proud to continue the artisanal tradition and contribute to an export industry that has flourished during the pandemic. “I love making cigars. It’s where I’ve spent my life, and it’s […]]]>

Published on:

Havana (AFP) – Sitting in front of a machine that checks the quality of cigars, Orquidea Gonzalez says she is proud to continue the artisanal tradition and contribute to an export industry that has flourished during the pandemic.

“I love making cigars. It’s where I’ve spent my life, and it’s an art. Not everyone knows how to make cigars, just like not everyone can paint a picture,” said the 55-year-old worker.

His job is to measure the draw of each cigar in a metal tube to ensure that the smoker gets the perfect puff.

#photo1

“If it’s below 40, the (suction) level is too high; if it’s above 80, it’s too low,” she explained, her eyes glued to the needle of the machine. .

The El Laguito factory opened in 1966 in West Havana to make the favorite cigars of hero of the 1959 communist revolution and longtime president Fidel Castro.

The factory is the birthplace of Cohiba cigars, Cuba’s most prestigious brand. The name is reminiscent of how the Taino natives referred to the rolled tobacco leaves they smoked.

Rolling your own leaves is a tradition that lives on among farmers in the western province of Pinar del Rio, where most of Cuba’s tobacco plantations are located.

Flavor

Castro’s favorite cigar, the Cohiba Lancero, which he smoked until he quit in 1985 at the age of 59, is still produced at the factory.

#photo2

“Despite all the difficulties we face”, the goal is to manufacture “nearly two million” cigars in 2022, or about 9,000 per day, said factory manager Oscar Rodriguez.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, exports of Cuban cigars increased by 15% in 2021, totaling $568 million, according to Habanos SA, which includes all national brands. This is a significant boon for the Cuban economy, which is struggling with its worst crisis in 30 years, with daily power shortages and cuts.

The factory “didn’t stop for a single day” during the pandemic, ultimately making cigars “the country’s second-largest export,” Rodriguez said.

Spain, China, Germany, France and Switzerland are among the main buyers.

Deftly wielding curved blades and a sticky substance, dozens of workers put the finishing touches to the ends of freshly rolled cigars.

About 60% of the workers are women – according to a factory tradition founded by Castro’s comrade-in-arms, Celia Sanchez – which aims to provide opportunities for single mothers or struggling women.

Another founder, Norma Fernandez, who died during the pandemic, rolled the cigars for the leader of the revolution.

“It was a privilege to be able to say, ‘I made the president’s cigars,'” said Orquidea Gonzalez, who worked hard at the factory, housed in an elegant 1950s villa.

#photo3

Caridad Mesa, now 55, started working in El Laguito as a cleaner. Thirty years later, she is in charge of spotting the slightest faults in cigars.

You have to control “the quality, the weight, the length… the thickness,” she said, peering into boxes overflowing with cigars under a large portrait of communist revolutionary icon Ernesto “Che” Guevara.

Cohiba cigars, which include a wide range of styles, can cost between $30 and $200 each, in Cuba and abroad.

“Cuban tobacco is distinguished from all other kinds by the flavor of the land of Pinar del Rio,” Gonzalez said.

It is there, she added, “where the best tobacco crops grow.”

]]>
Putin is waging an economic war with Europe. Britain’s absurd energy plan plays into its hands | will huton https://cc87portedoc.com/putin-is-waging-an-economic-war-with-europe-britains-absurd-energy-plan-plays-into-its-hands-will-huton/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 06:30:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/putin-is-waging-an-economic-war-with-europe-britains-absurd-energy-plan-plays-into-its-hands-will-huton/ Jhe Brexit libertarians control our destiny for at least the next two years and already the scale of the threat they pose to our well-being and security is becoming clear. Prime Minister Liz Truss may have swallowed her own words from just a month ago that she was against ‘handouts’ to launch the biggest handout […]]]>

Jhe Brexit libertarians control our destiny for at least the next two years and already the scale of the threat they pose to our well-being and security is becoming clear. Prime Minister Liz Truss may have swallowed her own words from just a month ago that she was against ‘handouts’ to launch the biggest handout in our history, but it was to offer her , to her and her acolytes, the political respite to launch their programs. The energy price cap could have been a jaw-dropping turnaround, but it had a darker purpose.

The intention was betrayed by the summary dismissal by Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng of Sir Tom Scholar, one of our best and most dedicated civil servants, now a former Permanent Secretary to the Treasury. Kwarteng’s thinking came to light when he blamed “the same old economic managerialism” for leaving Britain “with a stagnant economy and anemic growth”.

“Bold action,” he suggested, was imperative to relieve this “toxic combination”: “Cutting taxes, putting money back in people’s pockets, and freeing our businesses from heavy taxes and misguided regulations .” Only then could investment and growth be unlocked. Better that, he added, than “burying your head in a redistributive struggle for what’s left”.

This is baseless hogwash – ideological faith triumphing over evidence and reason. In these terms, Scholar, exemplary of the so-called old economic managerialism, had to go. We are on an economical carousel run by fairies and fools.

Of course, the two-year price cap of £2,500 is welcome. It will remove the threat of desperate choices for heat or food from millions of people. It will also reduce the peak rate of inflation by up to 4% and so reduce full-year debt servicing costs by around £20bn – a quarter of our national debt is represented by bonds indexed to the level of inflation. It will also partly eliminate the risk of a dangerous wage price spiral. But these are the reasons why Labor first advocated a price cap. Libertarians only changed tack when they realized that resisting and sticking to their preferred response of minimalist tax cuts and rebates risked overwhelming them politically.

But you don’t win wars and reset economies with daffy libertarianism. Europe is in a de facto war with Russia over Ukraine as it threatens to cap Russian gas prices. Putin responded by telling Vladivostok that ultimately Russia will not export anything – no gas, no oil, no food – to Europe. It is an economic war rather than a war on the battlefield, but it is a war nonetheless. British energy policy is not serious, it betrays the cause.

Energy policy in an era of potentially prolonged supply disruption must be designed for the long term; must protect businesses as well as consumers; must be financially viable and avoid the risk of breakdowns. The government’s plan is failing on all counts.

Basically, it’s not financially viable: Britain’s national debt, as the Trussians continually say, is the lowest in the G7, except for Germany, so there’s room to borrow. But the dollar, yen and euro are the world’s reserve currencies and Canada has a balance of payments surplus. Britain stands alone, outside one of the major trading blocs, with a weak legacy economy and a chronic deficit of international payments. He cannot sell at least £100bn of additional government debt a year to protect living standards rather than increase investment without the threat of further sterling weakness or a forced rise in interest rate.

Financial viability could have been approached in several ways. A new windfall tax could have been imposed on the windfall profits of the energy sector. Furthermore, for the duration of the war in Ukraine, all gas and oil from British fields would have to be sold to the government on a cost-plus basis rather than distorted international prices. Consumers could have been told to tighten their belts, ministers leading by example and a rationing system deployed if necessary. There should be a state-led emergency program for the construction of onshore and offshore wind farms, – the fastest and cheapest way to increase energy supply – as well as the acceleration of the program of house insulation.

For libertarians, each of these measures sticks to their throats. So they offer untargeted, albeit generous, aid to households but, while acknowledging the near-unlimited costs, they have limited business aid to six months. Scared of what might come next, companies will batten down the hatches so that Kwarteng reversing the proposed corporate tax hike will have no effect on investment. He is also aware of the risk of outages this winter, not relieved by the uncertain prospect of fractured gas in service a decade from now.

At least when Britain was in the single market, it was linked via undersea interconnectors to the Irish, Dutch, French and Belgian networks; it was also linked, in a special agreement, with Norway. The price was fixed in the single market and electricity flowed freely as capacity ebbed and flowed between the networks.

Today, Brexit Britain has developed a bureaucratic and costly auction system, raising the price of electricity and exposing us to supply shocks. In addition, US Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm demanded that all US refineries exporting gasoline, diesel and distillates accumulate reserves rather than export – coinciding with Russia’s shutdown. This is another supply threat.

Prior to these challenges, the EU had built up its gas reserves in a process in which we should have participated. But it wasn’t until late August that Centrica got the go-ahead to reopen its raw gas storage facility in the North Sea; and that can only be brought back into use slowly. This winter, it will only be of marginal help.

So libertarians manage energy crises and wage wars. Planning, using state power, taxing, regulating, building reserves and working with other Europeans are all anathema. The same philosophy that is going nowhere will inform the “fiscal event” of tax cuts later this month, which will further inflate our national debt to no avail. Growth is the result of well-organized and imaginatively directed investments by the public and private sectors in an interdependent relationship – without making individual so-called “wealth creators” even richer through tax cuts.

The whole project will fail. Too bad that, whatever damage it will cause to the Conservative Party, we are all condemned to experience the same disaster.

Will Hutton is an Observer columnist

]]>
Chile should reject dictatorship-era constitution review https://cc87portedoc.com/chile-should-reject-dictatorship-era-constitution-review/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 05:34:18 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/chile-should-reject-dictatorship-era-constitution-review/ Santiago (AFP) – Chileans will go to the polls on Sunday to choose whether or not to adopt a new constitution that aims to transform its market-oriented society into a more welfare-based one while enacting sweeping institutional reforms. While Chileans had previously voted en masse for a rewrite of the current constitution, adopted in 1980 […]]]>

Santiago (AFP) – Chileans will go to the polls on Sunday to choose whether or not to adopt a new constitution that aims to transform its market-oriented society into a more welfare-based one while enacting sweeping institutional reforms.

While Chileans had previously voted en masse for a rewrite of the current constitution, adopted in 1980 under the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990), opinion polls suggest that the new text will be rejected.

Social upheaval that began in 2019 as tens of thousands demanded a fairer society provided the impetus to revise the constitution, but several clauses in the proposed 388-article draft have proven controversial.

“I’m going to reject it because it’s a constitution that started badly,” Maria Angelica Ebnes, a 66-year-old housewife in Santiago, told AFP.

“It was forced, by violence.”

In October 2019, protests erupted mainly in the capital, led by students initially angered by a proposed rise in metro fares.

This has morphed into broader discontent with the country’s neoliberal economic system as well as growing inequality.

Although polls predict that the new constitution will be rejected, supporters are still hopeful, especially because of what they see on the streets.

An estimated 500,000 people turned out for the official closing of the “endorsement” campaign in Santiago on Thursday night, while no more than 500 turned out for the “rejection” rally.

“People will go out and vote in droves and the polls will be wrong once again,” said Juan Carlos Latorre, a lawmaker in leftist President Gabriel Boric’s ruling coalition, which backs the new text.

Over 15 million Chileans are eligible to vote in the mandatory referendum.

The main concern of voters is the importance given to the country’s indigenous peoples, who make up nearly 13% of the 19 million inhabitants.

Proposals to legalize abortion and protect the environment as well as natural resources such as water, which are currently often overexploited by private mining companies, have also received a lot of attention.

The new constitution would also overhaul Chile’s government, replacing the Senate with a less powerful “chamber of regions” and requiring women to hold at least 50% of positions in public institutions.

#photo1

5% chance to ‘approve’

While recent polls have pushed the “rejected” vote up by as much as 10 percentage points, sociologist Marta Lagos thinks “approve” could still win the plebiscite.

In the vast metropolitan area of ​​Santiago, the majority of people seem likely to vote for it, although the north and especially the south are largely against it.

“There is always the possibility that all the polls are wrong and indeed the advantage to ‘approve’ in Santiago could offset the disadvantage in the north and south,” Lagos told AFP.

“I don’t think that possibility is more than 5%, and ‘dismissing’ it has a 95% chance of winning.”

But what she is certain of is that “the gap will not be 10 points as the three polls published in the last two weeks say”.

Only a simple majority is required for the new constitution to be adopted.

About 40 world-renowned economists and political scientists expressed their support for the new project last week.

Still, some fear that the new constitution will generate instability and uncertainty, which could then harm the economy.

#photo2

“What you can see is a certain conservatism in the Chilean electorate that we haven’t seen in years,” Lagos said.

It was certainly muted last December when millennial Boric was elected president.

Controversial Indigenous clauses

Supporters of the new constitution say it will bring about major changes in a conservative country marked by social and ethnic tensions and lay the foundations for a more equal society.

They say the current constitution, which has given free rein to private enterprise in crucial industries, has created fertile ground for the rich to thrive and the poor to struggle.

Although the 1980 constitution has undergone several reforms since its adoption, it retains the stigma of having been introduced during a dictatorship.

Having already voted to rewrite the constitution and then elect the representatives to do so, this will be the third time in just two years that Chileans have gone to the polls on this issue.

The new text was drawn up by a constitutional convention made up of 154 members – mostly without political affiliation – divided equally between men and women, and with 17 seats reserved for indigenous people.

#photo3

The resulting proposal recognizes 11 indigenous peoples and provides them with greater autonomy, including in judicial matters.

This is the most controversial clause, with some critics accusing the authors of trying to turn traditionally marginalized indigenous people into an upper class of citizens.

If accepted, the Chilean Congress will then begin to decide how to apply the new laws. If the new text is rejected, the current constitution will remain in place.

]]>
Bringing Home Somany’s New French Collection https://cc87portedoc.com/bringing-home-somanys-new-french-collection/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 12:55:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/bringing-home-somanys-new-french-collection/ New Delhi [India], Sep 3 (ANI/NewsSee): Somany Ceramics Limited, an internationally renowned organization specializing in the ceramics and related product segments, is delighted to launch the exquisite new line of bathware ‘French Collection by Somany” at the Radisson Blu, Dwarka, New Delhi attended by Abhishek Somany, MD and CEO, Somany Ceramics Ltd and Shrivatsa Somany […]]]>

New Delhi [India], Sep 3 (ANI/NewsSee): Somany Ceramics Limited, an internationally renowned organization specializing in the ceramics and related product segments, is delighted to launch the exquisite new line of bathware ‘French Collection by Somany” at the Radisson Blu, Dwarka, New Delhi attended by Abhishek Somany, MD and CEO, Somany Ceramics Ltd and Shrivatsa Somany as well as Mayank Sharma and Vishal Kakkar. The highlight of the launch is the new collection of high-end faucets, namely Elysees, Diamante, Arizona and Liana, which feature smooth and uniform lines, longer life and elegant design.

The French collection of Somany is inspired by the French flower Iris or fleur de lys which means light, life and above all perfection. All products in the French Collection range are coated with PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) technology through a technique called magnetic sputtering in which the surface of the product is coated at the atomic level. It eliminates microporosity to make the surface resistant to germs and maintain surface properties longer. The extraordinary combination of style and elegance is inspired by French aesthetics, available in vibrant colors ranging from brushed gold, rose gold and matte black. The product range also includes a range of accessories that display a sumptuous impression and pleasant ambience.

At the launch event, Abhishek Somany, MD and CEO of Somany Ceramics Ltd said, “What we see today is the result of ‘years of experience and excellence achieved through performance driven by perseverance “. Designed, created and crafted with suave Imperial French, this ultra-luxurious collection is not only enriched with the legacy of The Somany @ 50 Years, but also puts you in the art connoisseur’s choice group. We sincerely hope that you will appreciate our efforts and enrich us with your experience by choosing our state of the art French art collection.”

With innovation in bathroom style, Somany’s high quality French collection offers faucets, ArtBasins (including Velena Arts basins which are available in 7 warm colors), showers, bathroom accessories baths and vanities.

Bathrooms are a space that attracts all eyeballs. With the ever-changing world of designs, enhance your bathware with Somany’s French Collection range and reflect smart, urban interior solutions in your home.

Somany Ceramics Limited (SCL) is one of the leading players in the ceramics industry in India. The company is a complete solution provider in terms of decoration solutions with the widest product categories – Ceramic Wall and Floor, Polished Vitreous Tiles, Glazed Vitreous Tiles, Sanitary Ware and Bath Accessories. It is the largest manufacturer and distributor of tiles in India with its presence all over India and also exports its products to over 55 countries across 6 continents. The company has access to a capacity of approximately 75 million square meters per year of tiles thanks to 2 own factories, 7 subsidiary/associate factories and outsourcing partnerships.

This story was provided by NewsSee. ANI shall in no way be responsible for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsView)

DISCLAIMER

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear reader,

Business Standard has always endeavored to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that matter to you and that have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your constant encouragement and feedback on how to improve our offering has only strengthened our resolve and commitment to these ideals. Even in these challenging times stemming from Covid-19, we remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative opinions and incisive commentary on relevant topical issues.
However, we have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more so that we can continue to bring you more great content. Our subscription model has received an encouraging response from many of you who have subscribed to our online content. More subscriptions to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of bringing you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practice the journalism we are committed to.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

digital editor

]]>
French won’t let energy prices rise as Johnson says buy kettle https://cc87portedoc.com/french-wont-let-energy-prices-rise-as-johnson-says-buy-kettle/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 13:19:10 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/french-wont-let-energy-prices-rise-as-johnson-says-buy-kettle/ Almost nine in ten UK adults (88%) are worried about rising energy prices after Ofgem’s latest price cap announcement, according to a survey. Almost half (45%) say they won’t be able to cope financially when the price cap drops to £3,549 from October 1, according to the Opinium poll. To mitigate rising costs, nearly two […]]]>

Almost nine in ten UK adults (88%) are worried about rising energy prices after Ofgem’s latest price cap announcement, according to a survey.

Almost half (45%) say they won’t be able to cope financially when the price cap drops to £3,549 from October 1, according to the Opinium poll.

To mitigate rising costs, nearly two in five (37%) have already cut spending on food and groceries, down from 28% since March.

Zahawi

It comes as Chancellor Nadhim Zahawi said ‘nobody should be cut off’ because they can’t pay their energy bills.

The minister also promised that the next Conservative government, which is set to take over from Boris Johnson’s administration after he resigns next Tuesday, will “go beyond” the support already pledged and that options for future decisions are being discussed. elaboration.

His remarks come as the Resolution Foundation warned that the next prime minister’s term is set to be dominated by the ‘terrifying’ prospect of the biggest squeeze in living standards for a century.

Mr Zahawi, speaking to Sky News during a visit to the US, was asked if he could guarantee that no one would end up in a position where he would be cut off because he would not have the means to pay their bills.

Zahawi’s comments were criticized by Jonathan Reynolds.

look

France

Rather than paying lip service in France, the government has insisted that electricity prices cannot rise by more than 4%.

As GMB presenter Richard Gaisford says: “It’s a very different picture from the scenes we see a few dozen miles across the Channel.”

look

However, we may have spoken too soon as Boris Johnson has some advice.

He told people to buy a new kettle and this purchase will save you ten euros a year on your electricity bill.

We want it to be a satire.

look

Related: As Truss says, trust the markets, this letter to the Guardian explains why it’s a bad idea

]]>