French Economy – CC87 Ported OC http://cc87portedoc.com/ Fri, 23 Jul 2021 06:31:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cc87portedoc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png French Economy – CC87 Ported OC http://cc87portedoc.com/ 32 32 Once its strength, water now threatens Germany https://cc87portedoc.com/once-its-strength-water-now-threatens-germany/ https://cc87portedoc.com/once-its-strength-water-now-threatens-germany/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 06:11:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/once-its-strength-water-now-threatens-germany/ Heavy rains cause destruction in Germany The backbone of Germany’s industrial success on inland waterways Floods threaten Germany more than its neighbors BAD MUENSTEREIFEL, Germany, July 23 (Reuters) – Bad Muenstereifel’s transformation from a quaint but sleepy German tourist town into a factory outlet mall has put it on the map for millions of visitors. […]]]>
  • Heavy rains cause destruction in Germany
  • The backbone of Germany’s industrial success on inland waterways
  • Floods threaten Germany more than its neighbors

BAD MUENSTEREIFEL, Germany, July 23 (Reuters) – Bad Muenstereifel’s transformation from a quaint but sleepy German tourist town into a factory outlet mall has put it on the map for millions of visitors.

Then floods devastated its medieval streets and half-timbered buildings, underlining the vulnerability of Europe’s first economy to an increasingly unpredictable climate.

Beyond the city, the flooding spread from an area near the western city of Cologne to southern Bavaria, hitting the historic centers of Aachen and Trier and leaving a trail of destruction behind it.

In recent years, further heavy flooding has hit other parts of Germany, overflowing the banks of the rivers that have played such a key role in its prosperity.

The floods caused tens of billions of euros in damage – an economic blow far greater than any neighbor of Germany has suffered from flooding, according to a study by Swiss Re, which assures insurers.

In Bad Muenstereifel, the focus was on immediate damage. As dozens of soldiers walked past orange buckets of debris and sludge, Marita Hochguertel recalled the city’s renovation after 2014, when an investor brought in dozens of factory outlets to fill empty storefronts.

Visitors more than doubled to 2.5 million a year, triggering a renovation boom, said Hochguertel, who worked for the city government for 42 years.

“It brought the city to life,” she said outside the council building as muddy crews worked with bulldozers to clean up wreckage, from broken chairs to the models’ stray legs.

The piles of garbage grew larger as the day wore on. The odors of diesel-powered water pumps and dust polluted the air. A crashed car lay stuck sideways in the narrow river.

The footage shocked Germany, sparking a debate ahead of national elections that could loosen Chancellor Angela Merkel’s hold on Christian Democrats power and strengthen the Green Party.

MOST EXPENSIVE EVER

Much of German industry, including metals giant Thyssen Krupp and chemical giants Bayer and BASF, has developed in centers close to waterways such as the Rhine – which has also been affected by the recent floods.

The network of rivers and canals remains the most extensive in Europe, carrying around 200 million tonnes of freight each year, from grain to coal to oil. But it quickly becomes a threat.

It was the third major flood to hit Germany since the turn of the century.

In 2002, the Elbe was flooded, affecting Dresden and other cities. In 2013, floods hit Bavaria hard along the Danube and Inn rivers.

The damages for the two years totaled 42 billion euros, and less than a quarter of them were insured, according to Swiss Re.

The July floods are expected to be the costliest in German history, according to the German Insurance Association, which estimated claims alone at up to 5 billion euros.

The total cost, with torn roads, railroads and telephone lines, already seen in the billions, will far exceed that.

ICEYE, which monitors flood-prone areas for insurers using satellite imagery, estimates that more than 37,000 German buildings were affected in July, compared to less than 1,700 in neighboring Netherlands.

Even before this most recent disaster, Swiss Re estimated the economic cost of flooding in Germany over the past decades to be more than twice that of France or Britain.

But public debate, in a heavily industrialized country that depends on diesel cars, machinery and other goods to thrive, had been stifled among much of the population.

This may be about to change.

Anders Levermann, who has advised the German government on climate change, said he was concerned that flooding could upend the economy and political order if they became much more common events.

“What will happen if extreme weather conditions become so frequent that we don’t have time to recover in between?” ” he said. Germany’s role as an exporter means supply chains across the world could also be at risk, Levermann added.

A LONG SLOG

In the Netherlands, where about half the country is below sea level and where they have spent centuries holding water, planning has been going on for decades. It has fared better in the recent floods.

“We have been anticipating this for a long time,” said Marjolijn Haasnoot, a Dutch climatologist.

“This amount of flooding will happen much more frequently… due to climate change.”

The Dutch are also slowly getting into a debate that may need to take place in Germany – over whether they should simply cede land to the advance of water.

“A lot of people think they can protect everything with dikes. What they don’t realize is that seawater is seeping inland under dikes,” said Maarten Kleinhans from the University of Utrecht.

“In the long run, half the country is at risk,” he said of Hollande. “We have seen this in the past – that villages and towns have been washed away or disappeared into the ground. You can build dikes to defend towns, but you cannot do it everywhere.”

In Bad Muenstereifel, Michael Starkel, a hotel owner and head of the local trade association, worries people will pack their bags and come back.

“I have spoken to many people in the old town who really have thoughts of leaving,” he said during a break after helping cleanup crews clean the river beds of tree trunks. ‘trees and other rubbish.

If history is any indicator, the residents of the disaster area are in for a long chore.

Deggendorf, a town of 37,000 inhabitants in Bavaria hit by floods and a dam failure in 2013, is still recovering, said Viola Muehlbauer, head of the mayor’s office.

“It will surely be a very, very long process until everything is back to normal.”

Writing by John O’Donnell; Editing by Andrew Heavens

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Most Americans Think Today’s Children Will Be Poorer Than Their Parents https://cc87portedoc.com/most-americans-think-todays-children-will-be-poorer-than-their-parents/ https://cc87portedoc.com/most-americans-think-todays-children-will-be-poorer-than-their-parents/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 20:45:10 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/most-americans-think-todays-children-will-be-poorer-than-their-parents/ The economy could finally rebound after the pandemic, but not for everyone. A new survey from the Pew Research Center found that respondents believe children will be worse off than their parents. Young workers have already been affected by at least one recession and one pandemic. Loading Something is loading. The economy may be recovering […]]]>
  • The economy could finally rebound after the pandemic, but not for everyone.
  • A new survey from the Pew Research Center found that respondents believe children will be worse off than their parents.
  • Young workers have already been affected by at least one recession and one pandemic.

The economy may be recovering and people are getting a little more optimistic, but many still believe that the economic wounds will have a lasting impact.

A new survey from the Pew Research Center found that in 17 audiences, including the United States, a majority of respondents believe children will be worse off financially than their parents. Among all those surveyed, a median of 64% were pessimistic about the financial future of children.

That number was higher for American respondents, with 68% saying they think children will be worse off financially. However, respondents in France and Japan were even more concerned, with 77% of respondents in both countries saying they think children will be worse off financially.

Another generational wealth gap

As Insider’s Hillary Hoffower previously noted, there is already a wealth gap between baby boomers and millennials. The older generation has benefited from everything from low interest rates to investments in companies that boost pollution – a problem that will exacerbate the climate crisis and its strain on the younger generation.

It is above the Grand

Recession
already leaving millennials behind when it comes to wealth accumulation; as Insider’s Hillary Hoffower reported, the

Federal Reserve
The Bank of St. Louis found that millennials were earning 34% less than they would have been if there had been no recession.

Plus, last year brought another recession. This time the young workers were once again clubbed. According to a report by the International Labor Organization, workers aged 15 to 24 suffered job losses of 8.7%; among adults, the job loss was 3.7% roughly. This report warned that Generation Z, which dealt with education interrupted by the pandemic and a recession when entering the workforce, risked becoming a “lost generation.”

As Insider’s Hillary Hoffower reported, Gen Z was the most unemployed generation following the economic devastation of the pandemic. However, some hope may be on the horizon: Gen Z will still take control of the economy within a decade, Hoffower reported, despite the pandemic potentially causing them to lose $ 10 trillion in revenue.

Overall, a median of 52% of those polled in the Pew survey – and 71% in the United States – still think the current economic situation is bad. In New Zealand and Australia, respondents were more optimistic, with over 70% of respondents in both respondents that the economic situation is good.


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Survey shows opinions on work after COVID-19 pandemic https://cc87portedoc.com/survey-shows-opinions-on-work-after-covid-19-pandemic/ https://cc87portedoc.com/survey-shows-opinions-on-work-after-covid-19-pandemic/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 07:02:56 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/survey-shows-opinions-on-work-after-covid-19-pandemic/ Two-thirds of people around the world want to work flexibly when the COVID-19 pandemic is over, according to a new survey. And nearly a third are willing to quit their jobs if the boss sends them back to the office full time. The survey of workers in 29 countries also shows that people have handled […]]]>
  • Two-thirds of people around the world want to work flexibly when the COVID-19 pandemic is over, according to a new survey.
  • And nearly a third are willing to quit their jobs if the boss sends them back to the office full time.
  • The survey of workers in 29 countries also shows that people have handled working from home better than some feared.

There have been many predictions that the COVID-19 pandemic will permanently change the world of work. This is exactly what happened, according to a new global survey, with a majority of people around the world saying they want to continue working flexibly from home.

An Ipsos survey for the World Economic Forum of 12,500 working people in 29 countries found that a majority want flexible working to become the norm. And nearly a third (30%) said they would consider looking for another job if they were forced to return to the office full-time.

The survey also questions a number of dire predictions about the effects of remote working. Experts have warned that people will miss their colleagues, be less productive and burn out – but the survey finds only minority support for these views.

Just over half of those surveyed missed their colleagues, 64% said they were more productive with a flexible work schedule, and only a third complained of burnout. Only one in three respondents said they felt disengaged from work when working remotely.

A majority of employees want to continue working flexibly after the pandemic.

Image: Ipsos

But a majority (66%) said employers should allow more flexible working in the future. Support for greater flexibility was strongest among women, parents of school-aged children, adults under 35, and those with higher levels of education and income.

The percentage requesting more flexible work was roughly similar among people with children under 17 (68%) and those without children (63%). But not everyone in the survey wanted to work from home all the time.

a graph showing how attitudes towards flexible working vary across different demographic groups.

Attitudes towards flexible working vary among different demographic groups.

Image: Ipsos

Office nine to five anyone?

Globally, a quarter of people want to work in the office five days a week once the pandemic ends, with the strongest support in Mexico (40%). More than a third of people in South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Peru, India and the United States also want to come back five days a week.

Among those who favor flexible working, the average number of days per week that people want to work from home is 2.5. Chinese, Belgians and French are the least enthusiastic, preferring only 1.9 days per week from home, while Indians are the most enthusiastic, wanting 3.4 days.

a graph showing how the study shows how people around the world plan to return to the office.

The study shows how people around the world are planning to return to the office.

Image: Ipsos

Investigation highlights shift to remote work caused by COVID-19. Before the pandemic, 53% said they worked mostly or always in an office. At the time of the survey, carried out between May 21 and June 4, 2021, this figure had fallen to 39%.

The extent to which people work mostly or entirely from home varies considerably across countries, ranging from at least half of those surveyed in South America, Malaysia, Singapore and South Africa to 21 % in Russia and only 15% in China.

Before the pandemic, less than a quarter (24%) worked primarily from home globally. Today that number has risen to almost two-fifths (39%) and an additional 22% are working outside their home but not in an office. Three-quarters (76%) who now work from home say it is a consequence of COVID-19.

a graph showing that one-fifth of the world's workforce thinks they'll never work like they did before 2020.

Almost a fifth of the global workforce believe they will never work like they did before 2020.

Image: Ipsos

While a majority wish to retain the work flexibility they were granted during the pandemic, many believe it is inevitable that they will eventually return to the office. More than a quarter of people (27%) think it will happen within six months and 24% within a year.

Almost half of teleworkers in France, Saudi Arabia, the Netherlands and Hungary plan to return to the office within six months.

However, a third or more of workers in Australia, South Africa and the UK do not expect the world of work to return to the way it was before the pandemic – a view shared by almost a fifth (18% ) of the global workforce.

The first global pandemic in over 100 years, COVID-19 has spread around the world at an unprecedented rate. At the time of writing, 4.5 million cases have been confirmed and more than 300,000 people have died from the virus.

As countries seek to recover, some of the longer-term economic, trade, environmental, societal and technological challenges and opportunities are just starting to become visible.

To help all stakeholders – communities, governments, businesses and individuals understand the emerging risks and follow-up effects generated by the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with Marsh and McLennan and Zurich Insurance Group , launched its COVID -19 Risks Outlook: A Preliminary Mapping and its Implications – a companion for policymakers, building on the annual report of the Global Risks Forum.

The report finds that the economic impact of COVID-19 dominates business risk perception.

Businesses are invited to join the Forum’s work to help manage identified emerging risks of COVID-19 across sectors to shape a better future. Read the full COVID-19 Risk Outlook: A Preliminary Mapping and Implications report here, as well as our impact story with further information.



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A MassBay student selected for the Summer Institute on Diversity in Economics – Framingham SOURCE https://cc87portedoc.com/a-massbay-student-selected-for-the-summer-institute-on-diversity-in-economics-framingham-source/ https://cc87portedoc.com/a-massbay-student-selected-for-the-summer-institute-on-diversity-in-economics-framingham-source/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/a-massbay-student-selected-for-the-summer-institute-on-diversity-in-economics-framingham-source/ With full transparency, the press release and photo have been submitted to SOURCE media by MassBay Community College. *** WELLESLEY – MassBay Community College is pleased to announce that Pierre Alain Belcher of Newtonville, is the only community college student and the only student from Massachusetts, selected to participate in the inaugural cohort of the […]]]>

With full transparency, the press release and photo have been submitted to SOURCE media by MassBay Community College.

***

WELLESLEY – MassBay Community College is pleased to announce that Pierre Alain Belcher of Newtonville, is the only community college student and the only student from Massachusetts, selected to participate in the inaugural cohort of the Expanding Diversity in Economics Summer Institute ( EDE) organized by the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics at the University of Chicago (BFI).

The EDE Summer Institute is designed to identify and support talented undergraduate students from a wide range of backgrounds interested in the study of economics. The goal of the Becker Friedman Institute of Economics at the University of Chicago is to diversify the pool of students majoring in economics who may pursue a graduate program or a career related to economics.

“I am very excited and grateful to have the opportunity to be a part of this program and I would like to thank Professors MassBay Thomas Niemi and Courtney DeGeorge for writing letters of recommendation for me,” Belcher said. “The economy is an area that interests me a lot because in my country of origin, Haiti, the economy is unstable and there are not many opportunities for people to get ahead in business. I hope to return to Haiti one day to bring hope and my experience to help the Haitian people build a stable and prosperous economy.

According to the Becker Friedman Institute for Economics at the University of Chicago, Belcher was selected from over 200 applicants. He is one of 45 students selected for the inaugural cohort, which represents 31 higher education institutions and is made up of 33 women and 12 men, with 53% of participants identifying as African-American and 22% as Latinx. The cohort’s average GPA is 3.78 and 17 participants are first generation students.

Belcher, who studies international business in MassBay, moved to the United States three years ago from his native Haiti. He graduated from Newton North High School in Newton, MA in 2020, where he thrived both inside and outside the classroom. Belcher completed an advanced college preparation program focusing on science, math, and literature, earned the Massachusetts State Seal for French Literacy, placing in thee percentile for the Concours National de Français in 2020, and was a peer tutor in French. At Newton North High, he was also an athlete in three sports in soccer, basketball, and track and field and was a member of the high school drama group cast.

Since enrolling in MassBay in fall 2020, Belcher has made the Dean’s List, is part of the Honors program, and actively participates in MassBay’s Multicultural Mentorship Program, while studying remotely during the pandemic. Belcher is trilingual, speaking French, Haitian Creole and English. He works part-time at Whole Foods Market, while doing an internship at Horace Mann Elementary School in Newton.

Belcher is eager to learn more about the economy and its role in international affairs. His future goals include obtaining his associate degree and transferring to a four-year university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in international business and economics.

The EDE Summer Institute was launched by BFI in 2021 with support from the Booth School of Business, the Kenneth C. Griffin Department of Economics and the Northern Trust. This is a one-of-a-kind summer program targeting first-time undergraduates for exposure to economics. Participants receive a stipend for satisfactory completion of the three-week session, with students eligible for the Pell scholarship receiving additional funding. They also receive a certification of completion from the University of Chicago. The EDE will be held virtually from July 18 to August 6, 2021.

Following the 2021 summer program, participants will be part of an ongoing EDE mentoring network, and some participants will be eligible to participate in research projects and assistantships during the academic year.

***

MassBay Community College is MetroWest Boston’s most affordable higher education option, offering a strong portfolio of courses and over 70 associate degree and certificate programs with flexible day, evening and weekend classes in Ashland. , Framingham, Wellesley Hills and online. MassBay students receive unparalleled educational value by earning cumulative credits that transfer to bachelor’s degree programs, and out-of-the-box skills needed to advance careers in high-demand fields such as health and human sciences. life, automotive technology, engineering, business, cybersecurity and the humanities. MassBay’s Associate Degree in Nursing (RN) and Practical Nursing (LPN) programs were both ranked as the # 1 nursing program in Massachusetts in 2020-2021 by National Defense Organizations. of Nursing RegisteredNursing.org and PracticalNursing.org. Since its founding in 1961, MassBay has been accredited by several governing bodies and remains firmly committed to its mission of serving the needs of the various local communities it serves. We value the intrinsic worth of all individuals, collectively in the pursuit of inclusion and prioritize our work to achieve equity within our community and beyond


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Mary Kay Inc. Advocates Advancing Women’s Economic Empowerment and Gender Equality Through Series of Landmark Commitments and Partnerships Around the World | national news https://cc87portedoc.com/mary-kay-inc-advocates-advancing-womens-economic-empowerment-and-gender-equality-through-series-of-landmark-commitments-and-partnerships-around-the-world-national-news/ https://cc87portedoc.com/mary-kay-inc-advocates-advancing-womens-economic-empowerment-and-gender-equality-through-series-of-landmark-commitments-and-partnerships-around-the-world-national-news/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 13:03:45 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/mary-kay-inc-advocates-advancing-womens-economic-empowerment-and-gender-equality-through-series-of-landmark-commitments-and-partnerships-around-the-world-national-news/ DALLAS – (BUSINESS WIRE) – July 20, 2021– Mary Kay Inc., a global advocate for women’s empowerment and entrepreneurship, reinforced its commitment to advancing gender parity by issuing a position paper welcoming the European Commission’s Gender Equality Strategy for 2020-2025 and by joining the Global Action Coalitions of the Generation Equality Forum. This month, Mary […]]]>

DALLAS – (BUSINESS WIRE) – July 20, 2021–

Mary Kay Inc., a global advocate for women’s empowerment and entrepreneurship, reinforced its commitment to advancing gender parity by issuing a position paper welcoming the European Commission’s Gender Equality Strategy for 2020-2025 and by joining the Global Action Coalitions of the Generation Equality Forum.

This month, Mary Kay also joined the “Drivers of Change” program at the Generation Equality Forum in Paris, France (June 30 – July 2). (Graphic: Mary Kay Inc.)

The position paper, accessible here, echoes the European Union’s strategy on equality between women and men. According to the European Union: “The strategy sets out political goals and actions to make significant progress by 2025 towards a gender-equal Europe. The goal is a Union where women and men, girls and boys, in all their diversity, are free to follow the path they have chosen in life, have equal opportunities to flourish and can also participate and lead our European society. “

“Discriminatory laws, gender bias and stereotypes, violence against women and girls – these are all global issues and must be addressed in partnership with the public and private sectors and civil society organizations around the world”, said Julia Simon, Legal and Diversity Director. at Mary Kay. “Achieving gender equality is essential to the survival of the planet and to rebuilding more sustainable and prosperous economies and societies. “

This month, Mary Kay also joined the “Drivers of Change” program at the Generation Equality Forum in Paris, France (June 30 – July 2). 26 years after the Beijing Declaration, the Generation Equality Forum, organized by UN Women and co-organized by the governments of Mexico and France, was “the most critical moment in a generation to invest in gender equality. gender and accelerate momentum for women’s security, leadership and economic opportunity 1 ”.

Julia Simon participated in a panel titled “Building a Transformative Strategy for Gender Responsive Purchasing”, aimed at raising awareness of disproportionately complex and interconnected barriers to female entrepreneurship and promoting gender responsive purchasing. Globally, 1 in 3 businesses are owned by women 2, but women earn only 1% of procurement spending from governments and large corporations.3 Speakers shared concrete ideas and advice backed by their own path on the implementation of a GRP strategy.

At the Paris Forum, Mary Kay also joined four of the Generation Equality action coalitions through political, programmatic and advocacy engagements: Justice and Economic Rights; Feminist action for climate justice; Gender-based violence and innovation and technology. 50,000 people virtually engaged in the Forum, which brought together 1,000 members, recorded 40 billion dollars in investments in favor of gender equality in support of a five-year plan to act for equality in 6 areas of ‘action.

These pledges are the latest in a series of Mary Kay advocacy efforts for women’s economic empowerment and gender equality at high-level gatherings around the world alongside its UN partners. United Nations and its local strategic partners.

  • On March 16, 2021, Mary Kay COO Deborah Gibbins joined the United Nations Global Compact on Gender Equality meeting to discuss how Mary Kay empowers women entrepreneurs in nearly 40 countries . Gibbins pointed to data recently released by the World Bank 4 showing that on average around the world, women have three quarters of men’s legal rights. She challenged businesses to take a stand against legal discrimination and advocate for reforms to close the gaps so that women can reach their full potential. The event brought together over 5,000 people from business, the United Nations, Member States and civil society organizations from over 100 countries, with 75% of attendees representing the private sector.
  • On March 24, 2021, on the sidelines of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW65), Gibbins participated in a panel organized by the Women’s Empowerment Accelerator (WEA) entitled “Women Leading Economic Recovery Through Entrepreneurship” where she highlighted the need public-private partnerships to help shape an ecosystem favorable to women entrepreneurs. Launched by Mary Kay in collaboration with 5 United Nations agencies, The Women’s Entrepreneurship Accelerator was presented as an example of the unique impact of multi-partnership in accelerating change.
  • From March 26 to April 4, Edita Szabóová, Managing Director of Mary Kay Czech Republic and Slovakia, delivered her remarks at the Equal Pay Day conference where she highlighted the importance of “women who support women” and highlighted Mary Kay’s work for women. entrepreneurs through training, leadership and mentoring. “When women come together, we can do amazing things for the benefit of women and humanity in general. Because we know that if we lift one, we lift everything. Basically, Mary Kay develops and trains entrepreneurs who in turn start their own businesses and write their own stories and legacies for their daughters, ”Szabóová said.
  • From June 15-16, 2021, at the United Nations Global Compact Leaders Summit, Gibbins spoke at the main stage session “Women in Sustainable Development: Innovating in a Man’s World”, advocating for women entrepreneurs as necessary models for the economy and society. She also underlined the essential mission of the women’s entrepreneurship accelerator launched by Mary Kay with 5 United Nations partner agencies: UN Women, the United Nations Global Compact, the International Trade Center, the International Labor Organization and the United Nations Development Program. The Accelerator is committed to educating and empowering 5 million women entrepreneurs over the next 10 years. “Women entrepreneurship will play a key role in the success of the recovery from the pandemic. This is why the mission of the Women’s Entrepreneurship Accelerator is so timely. And that’s why women entrepreneurs need a framework of this magnitude, ”Gibbins said. The annual summit brought together nearly 25,000 business, government, UN and civil society leaders to take stock of progress and take collective action to mitigate the climate crisis , the global pandemic, economic disparities and social inequalities.
  • On July 6, in Yekaterinburg, Mary Kay joined the INNOPROM-2021 International Industry Fair, the main industrial, trade and export platform in Russia. Guest speaker at a panel organized by UN Women titled “UN Women Programs for the Promotion and Development of Gender Based Entrepreneurship,” Mary Kay underlined the critical importance of gender responsive procurement strategies. and stressed that the pandemic also offers a unique opportunity to move forward. action and support women’s businesses around the world.

One of the first glass ceiling breakers, Mary Kay Ash founded her beauty business almost 58 years ago with three goals: to develop rewarding opportunities for women, to deliver compelling products and to make the world a better place. That dream has grown into a multi-billion dollar business with millions of independent sales force members in nearly 40 countries. Mary Kay is dedicated to investing in the science behind beauty and making cutting-edge skin care, color cosmetics, nutritional supplements and fragrances. Mary Kay is committed to empowering women and their families by partnering with organizations around the world, focusing on supporting cancer research, protecting survivors of domestic violence, beautifying our communities and by encouraging children to make their dreams come true. Mary Kay Ash’s original vision continues to shine, one lipstick at a time. Learn more at www.marykay.com

4 Women, Business and the Law, 2021. A report produced in 190 countries.

MEDIA CONTACT: Mary Kay Inc. Corporate Communications

KEYWORD: AUSTRALIA / OCEANIA UNITED STATES FRANCE NORTH AMERICA ASIA PACIFIC EUROPE TEXAS

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: PUBLIC POLICY / GOVERNMENT WOMEN OTHER POLICY ISSUES CONSUMER COSMETICS CATALOG OTHER CONSUMERS DETAIL

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 07/20/2021 09:03 am / DISC: 07/20/2021 09:03 am

Copyright Business Wire 2021.


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France and South Pacific Countries Fight “Predatory” Fishing as China Expands Reach https://cc87portedoc.com/france-and-south-pacific-countries-fight-predatory-fishing-as-china-expands-reach/ https://cc87portedoc.com/france-and-south-pacific-countries-fight-predatory-fishing-as-china-expands-reach/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 04:25:00 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/france-and-south-pacific-countries-fight-predatory-fishing-as-china-expands-reach/ The United States and its allies, including France, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, are actively expanding their activity in the Pacific to counter China’s influence. Though tiny in land mass, the Pacific Islands control vast swathes of resource-rich ocean known as Exclusive Economic Zones, forming a formidable border between the Americas and Asia. “To better […]]]>


The United States and its allies, including France, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, are actively expanding their activity in the Pacific to counter China’s influence.

Though tiny in land mass, the Pacific Islands control vast swathes of resource-rich ocean known as Exclusive Economic Zones, forming a formidable border between the Americas and Asia.

“To better cope with the predatory logic of which we are all victims, I wish to strengthen our maritime cooperation in the South Pacific,” Macron said after a videoconference with the leaders of Australia, the Marshall Islands, from Papua New Guinea and representatives from New Guinea. Zealand and other Pacific countries.

“We will launch a coastguard network for the South Pacific around three main objectives: information sharing, operational cooperation and training,” he said.

Macron did not name China in his closing remarks. When asked if the policy was aimed at expanding China, a French presidential adviser said it targeted illegal fishing which was “largely due to private actors”.

Chinese fishing fleets – from private boats to commercial trawlers owned by publicly traded companies – have sunk deeper into Southeast Asian waters in search of new fishing grounds as stocks grow. dwindle closer to home.

They ventured into disputed waters, sparking diplomatic wrangling with countries around the South China Sea but as far away as Argentina.

France, which has island territories covering the Indo-Pacific, including Réunion in the Indian Ocean and French Polynesia in the Pacific, has strengthened its defense links with Australia and India as part of an initiative to counter Chinese influence in the region.



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Regardless of the upgrade, there is an age-old problem to solve – Institute For Fiscal Studies https://cc87portedoc.com/regardless-of-the-upgrade-there-is-an-age-old-problem-to-solve-institute-for-fiscal-studies/ https://cc87portedoc.com/regardless-of-the-upgrade-there-is-an-age-old-problem-to-solve-institute-for-fiscal-studies/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 11:09:52 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/regardless-of-the-upgrade-there-is-an-age-old-problem-to-solve-institute-for-fiscal-studies/ I hesitate to delve into the discussion about leveling up. I have no answers. Nor, really, anyone else, let alone the Prime Minister, who certainly provided none in last week’s long-drawn but ultimately empty speech. Again, he is in good company. This ambition to level up isn’t new, after all. Efforts to reduce spatial disparities […]]]>


I hesitate to delve into the discussion about leveling up. I have no answers. Nor, really, anyone else, let alone the Prime Minister, who certainly provided none in last week’s long-drawn but ultimately empty speech. Again, he is in good company. This ambition to level up isn’t new, after all. Efforts to reduce spatial disparities in the UK date back at least to the Special Zones Act 1934. The disparities between regions in the UK are long standing and, in some dimensions, at least, have not changed much in decades.

So what is the problem, what can we do to fix it and how will we know when we are successful?

You might think the answer to the first question was obvious: some parts of the country, London, the South East, are much better off than other parts, the Midlands and the North. Not, in fact, if you look at people’s disposable income. Once housing costs are taken into account, the median disposable income in London is no higher than the national average. Other things are very different, however. There are big differences in productivity. Salaries are higher in London. According to Professor Henry Overman of the London School of Economics, this is mainly because of where the best educated and skilled people live and work, rather than because there is a big difference between what people of the same level can win in different parts of the country. There are many more graduates in London than in the North.

A very big difference is that the very rich, both the richest and the richest, are concentrated in London and in the South East. The poor are not only always with us, they are everywhere, as numerous in London as elsewhere.

The problem economically is that good, high-skilled, well-paying jobs are not distributed evenly across the country. The poorest regions are losing too many of their better educated young people because they do not have attractive jobs to turn to. Highly skilled jobs are difficult to find in areas with few highly skilled workers. You see the problem.

The term “good jobs” is important. We are not the only ones who worry about these things. It has probably escaped you that in France, a commission of eminent economists, headed by Nobel laureate Jean Tirole and the former chief economist of the International Monetary Fund Olivier Blanchard, has just completed a report commissioned by President Macron. It examines three major economic challenges: climate change, demographic change and inequality. It’s hard to imagine Prime Minister Johnson ordering something similar.

They worry about inequalities there too, even though income inequalities are much lower than here, in part because of a much more generous benefit system. Their proof of what really worries their countrymen – a good place to start, by the way – is that unequal incomes per se are not the problem. Unequal opportunities and in particular the opportunities to get a “good job” are what matters. The French, and I suspect the British rather, consider that a good job is one which “offers them a reasonably long tenure in the company, salary progression and good benefits, responsibilities, promotion opportunities and a decent working environment. A good working life is one in which, in addition, if a good job is made redundant, another good one can be found. The problem is that inadequate education and training, along with changing technology and business models, has resulted in a hollowing out of traditional skilled and middle-class jobs, especially in peripheral regions.

Easy to say, difficult to approach. But it rings true. Ed Miliband could have said we needed a pre-distribution. Others might require an industrial strategy. Perhaps the greatest economic challenge we face is finding ways to manage the effects of trade and technological change in a way that promotes rather than undermines good jobs. One thing is certain. Redistribution of income through higher benefits may be necessary, it may reduce income inequalities, but it will not reduce those inequalities that people seem to really care about.

The Prime Minister quoted Andy Haldane, former chief economist at the Bank of England, for saying that our economy “is about to recover like a coil spring”. That did not prevent him from dissolving the industrial strategy board, of which Haldane was chairman. Johnson, however, may agree with his view that “sustainable local growth must be anchored in local strategies, covering not only infrastructure but also skills, sectors, education and culture” . You cannot level up from the center. If there was any content to his speech, it was his nod to the need for more elected mayors and greater decentralization of power from the center.

How will we know if we are making progress? The obvious thing to look at will be the distribution of wages, skilled jobs and skilled workers across the country. There is, however, an even more fundamental difference between us, the narrowing of which I would take as real and unmistakable proof of success. Johnson said he was outraged that “a man from Glasgow or Blackpool is on average ten years younger on this planet than a man growing up in Hart, Hampshire or Rutland”. Why, he asked, “do the people of Rutland live to such stupendous ages?”

We know the answer to this. People who are better off, and have happier, more fulfilling lives and good jobs, live longer and healthier lives than those who don’t. This is the clear conclusion of decades of work on health inequalities.

We will know that we are on the verge of taking it to the next level when the differences in health and life expectancy across the country begin to diminish. Unfortunately, it is a measure of inequality that has clearly moved in the wrong direction over the past decade.

This article first appeared in The Times and is reproduced here with kind permission.



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Thousands of people protest vaccination, COVID passes https://cc87portedoc.com/thousands-of-people-protest-vaccination-covid-passes/ https://cc87portedoc.com/thousands-of-people-protest-vaccination-covid-passes/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 20:26:15 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/thousands-of-people-protest-vaccination-covid-passes/ PARIS (AP) – More than 100,000 people demonstrated across France on Saturday against the government’s latest measures to push people to get vaccinated and to curb the rise in infections with the delta variant of the coronavirus. In Paris, separate far-right and far-left protest marches crossed different parts of the city. Demonstrations also took place […]]]>


PARIS (AP) – More than 100,000 people demonstrated across France on Saturday against the government’s latest measures to push people to get vaccinated and to curb the rise in infections with the delta variant of the coronavirus.

In Paris, separate far-right and far-left protest marches crossed different parts of the city. Demonstrations also took place in Strasbourg to the east, Lille to the north, Montpellier to the south and elsewhere.

Thousands of people have responded to calls to take to the streets of Florian Philippot, a far-right politician and former right-hand man of Marine Le Pen who announced earlier this month he would run for president 2022. Gathered a stone’s throw from the Louvre, the demonstrators chanted “Macron, get out! “,” Freedom “and banged metal spoons on saucepans.

While Philippot staged small but regular protests against the government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis, Saturday’s protest drew a larger and more diverse crowd of people largely unhappy with politics: angry yellow vest activists against perceived economic injustice, far-right supporters, medical personnel and royalists.

They denounced on Monday the government’s decision to make vaccines compulsory for all health workers, and to require a “health pass” proving that people are fully vaccinated, have recently tested negative, or have recovered from the virus in order to access restaurants and other public places. The government of President Emmanuel Macron presents a bill on Monday to endorse the measures.

“I will never get vaccinated,” Bruno Auquier, a 53-year-old municipal councilor who lives on the outskirts of Paris. “People need to wake up,” he said, questioning the safety of the vaccine.

While France already requires several vaccinations to enter public school, Auquier has pledged to withdraw his two children from school if the coronavirus vaccine becomes compulsory. “These new measures are the last straw,” said Auquier.

The government has warned of the continued spread of the delta variant, which authorities say could again put pressure on hospitals if the number of people vaccinated against the virus is not sufficient. The pandemic has claimed the lives of France more than 111,000 and has deeply damaged the economy.

During a visit to a pop-up vaccination center in the southwest, Prime Minister Jean Castex urged the French to come together to overcome the crisis.

“There is only one solution: vaccination,” he said, stressing that it “protects us and will make us freer”.

During the Parisian demonstration, a worker in his sixties expressed his bitterness at the jobs in his sector that had been relocated. A 24-year-old royalist said he was there to demand “the return of God and the king”.

Lucien, a 28-year-old store manager, said he was not anti-vaccine, but believed that everyone should be able to do whatever they want with their own body. “The government is going too far,” he said. Her friend Elise, 26, said: “I have been vaccinated against diphtheria, tetanus and polio. But the COVID vaccine is just too experimental. “

While a majority of French health workers have received at least one dose of vaccine, some are resisting the government’s decision to make vaccination compulsory for all staff in medical establishments.

At Saturday’s Paris protest, a 39-year-old environmental activist and hospital lab worker said she could resort to buying a fake vaccination certificate to avoid losing her job. A health worker disguised as a Statue of Liberty called it an “act of violence” to force people to get vaccinated.

In Montpellier, more than 1,000 people marched to the station chanting “Freedom! and carrying signs saying “Our children are not guinea pigs”. Security guards closed the main entrance to travelers and a dozen police officers took up positions in front.

The Interior Ministry said 114,000 people participated in protests across the country.

On Friday night, vandals ransacked a vaccination center in the southeast. Interior Minister Gérald Darmanin asked prefects and police chiefs to strengthen the security of elected officials, after several complained of having received threats in recent days about the latest anti-COVID measures.

Reluctance to vaccination is considered widespread in France, but appears to have subsided somewhat as 36 million French people have received doses of the coronavirus vaccine in recent months. Millions more have been injected or vaccinated since Monday’s announcement.

French health workers have until September 15 to get vaccinated. The COVID pass requirement for all restaurants, bars, hospitals, shopping malls, trains, planes and other places is being phased in from Wednesday.

Meanwhile, the French government announced tightened border controls from Sunday, but also said it would allow travelers from anywhere in the world who have been fully vaccinated.

This now includes people who received the vaccine made in India by AstraZeneca. The move came after a global outcry that the European Union’s COVID-19 certificate only recognizes AstraZeneca vaccines made in Europe.

___

Elaine Ganley in Montpellier and Angela Charlton in Paris contributed.

___

Follow AP’s pandemic coverage on:

https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic

https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine

https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak



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As Lebanon crumbles, Riad Salameh faces questions https://cc87portedoc.com/as-lebanon-crumbles-riad-salameh-faces-questions/ https://cc87portedoc.com/as-lebanon-crumbles-riad-salameh-faces-questions/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 13:03:45 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/as-lebanon-crumbles-riad-salameh-faces-questions/ The coronavirus pandemic and a huge explosion in the port of Beirut last August have further devastated the economy. Estimates put the central bank’s losses at between $ 50 billion and $ 60 billion. The International Monetary Fund has offered help, but Lebanese officials accuse Salameh of blocking an audit requested by the United States […]]]>


The coronavirus pandemic and a huge explosion in the port of Beirut last August have further devastated the economy.

Estimates put the central bank’s losses at between $ 50 billion and $ 60 billion. The International Monetary Fund has offered help, but Lebanese officials accuse Salameh of blocking an audit requested by the United States and other countries that would unlock IMF aid, as well as a separate investigation on suspected central bank fraud.

Most Lebanese said goodbye to the savings they had as the currency collapsed, cutting wages worth $ 1,000 a month to around $ 80. The central bank burns its reserves, spending around $ 500 million a month to subsidize imports of fuel, medicine and grain.

“Lebanon has lived on borrowed time, and now the chickens have returned home to roost,” said Toufic Gaspard, Lebanese economist and former IMF adviser. “The whole banking system collapsed and we became a money economy.”

The crash has soured many Lebanese over their once famous central banker.

“I can’t say anything good about Riad Salameh,” said Toufic Khueiri, co-owner of a popular kebab restaurant, having lunch with a friend in Beirut. “Our money is not blocked in the banks, it is simply stolen.”

His friend Roger Tanios, a lawyer, said he once admired Mr Salameh for maintaining Lebanon’s financial stability, but changed his mind.

Mr. Salameh, he said, had made a dramatic deviation.

“Every country has its mafia,” Tanios said. “In Lebanon, the mafia has its country.

Ben Hubbard reported from Beirut and Liz Alderman from Paris. Hwaida Saad contributed to Beirut reporting, and Asmaa al-Omar from Istanbul.



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Domestic politics bind Biden to Cuba https://cc87portedoc.com/domestic-politics-bind-biden-to-cuba/ https://cc87portedoc.com/domestic-politics-bind-biden-to-cuba/#respond Sat, 17 Jul 2021 01:32:16 +0000 https://cc87portedoc.com/domestic-politics-bind-biden-to-cuba/ Published on: 07/17/2021 – 03:32 Washington (AFP) Hopes that President Joe Biden will ease the draconian restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba imposed by his predecessor are being held hostage by domestic politics and the Cuban-American community that opposes Havana, analysts say. Biden was vice president when Barack Obama thawed relations with the Caribbean […]]]>


Published on:

Washington (AFP)

Hopes that President Joe Biden will ease the draconian restrictions on trade and travel with Cuba imposed by his predecessor are being held hostage by domestic politics and the Cuban-American community that opposes Havana, analysts say.

Biden was vice president when Barack Obama thawed relations with the Caribbean country in 2014, reopening diplomatic missions, abolishing a decades-old embargo, allowing American tourists to visit and import from the Communist-controlled island .

But U.S. support for last weekend’s anti-government protests across Cuba, and Biden’s tight calculations surrounding Democrats’ control of Congress, explain why he did not reverse the extreme punitive measures against Havana. put in place by President Donald Trump over the past four years.

Ahead of last year’s presidential election, Biden said he would reverse Trump’s policies. But pressed Thursday to know if he would ease the US embargo, Biden objected.

“Cuba is unfortunately a failed state and (is) repressing its citizens,” he told reporters.

“There are a number of things we would consider doing to help the Cuban people, but that would require different circumstances or a guarantee that they would not be exploited by the government.”

– “Challenge the diet” –

After taking office in January, many Democrats pressured Biden to reverse Trump’s policies.

# photo1

On March 2, 80 lawmakers called for swift action to “return to the diplomatic path mapped out by the Obama-Biden administration and end the nearly six-decade economic embargo.”

Most importantly, they wanted him to withdraw Trump’s designation of Cuba as sponsor of terrorism in January nine days before his resignation.

But the outbreak of protests in Cuba against social and political repression was a game-changer, with Republicans taking the opportunity to accuse Democrats of supporting the Havana regime.

“The Biden administration is betraying the freedom-loving Cuban people. I fought for Cuba, not them,” Trump, who still holds substantial political power, said in a statement.

The reality, said Dan Restrepo of the Center for American Progress, a think tank, is that Democrats may need the support of the strongly anti-Havana Cuban-American community to maintain control of Congress in the midterm elections. November 2022.

“Cuban politics and domestic politics are very difficult to separate,” he said.

Democrats lost five congressional seats last year in Florida, two in Cuban-dense Miami, reducing their control of the House of Representatives to a bare margin.

So, most Democrats are now urging Biden to stand firm with Cuban policies – essentially to leave Trump’s policies in place.

“We have to challenge the regime,” Democratic Senator Bob Menendez, chairman of the powerful Senate Foreign Relations Committee, told MSN.

“The regime must change to allow the Cuban people to prosper,” said Menendez, whose parents were Cuban immigrants and who has a large Cuban population in his constituency of New Jersey.

“We stand in solidarity with the thousands of peaceful protesters across Cuba who challenge its repressive regime. May their courage and this historic moment bring real change,” tweeted Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a Democratic lawmaker from South Florida.

– Political opportunity? –

Restrepo said negotiating support for the Cuban community was difficult, noting that Cuba’s most recent arrivals are more conservative than ever.

# photo2

“The hard-line stance on Cuba today is quite extreme among Cubans in South Florida, where the mayor of Miami is calling for military intervention,” he said.

According to a poll conducted last year by the Cuba Research Institute at Florida International University, 60% of Cuban Americans in South Florida support the continued embargo.

However, the poll also showed that significant majorities also supported Obama-Biden’s policies on diplomatic relations, the sale of food and medicine, allowing many trips to the island and the remittances that Trump brought. interrupted.

In view of this, Fernand Amandi, a Democratic pollster, told NPR radio that the Cuba issue could work to Biden’s advantage if he handled it proactively, visiting the Cuban community in Florida.

It could be “a political gift from the gods,” he said.

“But if he takes a more passive, behind-the-scenes wait-and-see approach, I think it will be both a policy and a lost political opportunity.”



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